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  Archived Posts From: 2010

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We know where the bodies are buried, do you?

Written on: October 26th, 2010 in Research Room

So have you ever been taking a nice leisurely walk through the woods, enjoying the fresh air, the sights, the sounds, and then boom you trip over something?  And has that something ever been a tombstone?  You can ask the gentleman that came in the other day because that’s exactly what happened to him.  Needless to say he was a little freaked out by the whole thing.  During his walk it seems he stumbled across an old family graveyard.  Some of the stones had broken while others were still in relatively good shape.  He wrote down the information that was on the stones and came in to see if he could find out more about the people.

 The stones were very old from the late 1700s to the mid 1800s. He was able to locate the individuals in the Walter G. Tatnall tombstone collection as well as the Tombstones of Sussex County book. He used our probate records, orphan’s court records, and our deed records to find out more about the family.

To learn more about the tombstone records we have here view our clip on the states YouTube channel.

 To see what other books on cemeteries we have browse the Delaware Library Catalog.



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Now That’s A Pot Hole!!

Written on: October 18th, 2010 in Research Room

I’m sure you’ve been reading in the papers about all the problems with some of the roads in Delaware.  We had a guy come in to see if we had any documents relating to the maintenance of roads. Seems he had just come from the garage after needing new shocks.  He said it was because of all the pot holes in his road. 

He looked at Department of Transportation annual reports, a description of roads book from the county engineer, road papers, road and bridge accounts, and of course, photographs.

  To see an exhibit of early Delaware roads, check out our State Highway Department Photographs that document the transportation history of Delaware in the 20th century.



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Scrapple’s Ready

Written on: October 8th, 2010 in Research Room

Do you smell it? Can you hear that? It’s the aroma of scrapple and the sound of apples crunching. Yup, it’s time for the apple scrapple festival in Bridgeville. To get ready for this event we had some wonderful ladies come in to see what we had on the town of Bridgeville. 

They were surprised that we have over 300 photographs and the town’s minutes from 1909 to 1990. You should have seen the look on their faces when they read the enrolled bill from 1822 that was “An act to prevent swine from running at large in the Village of Bridgeville”.  They had to ask “Do you have any records on scrapple?”  Why yes we do!  We have a livestock slaughter record book from 1932 to 1938 from the New Castle County workhouse that shows amount of products produced (ham, shoulders, loins, sausage, lard, and SCRAPPLE).  We also showed them a scrapbook from the Delaware State Apple Commission from 1951 to 1973.

To learn more about the festival click here


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Got A Delaware Library Card?

Written on: October 4th, 2010 in Research Room

Well then, you can now use it to log in to the Delaware page on Ancestry.com.  By using your card you can have free access to the records Ancestry has digitized for the Delaware Public Archives.  These records include births up to 1908, marriages up to 1933, and deaths up to 1933.  Coming soon will be naturalizations from 1796-1850, land records from 1677-1947, and will books from 1683-1947.

 Click here to go to the Delaware Library Catalog Page and log in with your library card. Then click on Delaware Genealogy Online in the menu at top of the page, and it will take you to the Delaware page of Ancestry.com.  Once you have searched, in order to view the record you will need to sign up for a free account.   It will ask you for your name and an email address. Ancestry.com will then email you a user name and password. Once you have your login and password, you can view the digitized records from the Delaware Public Archives anytime.  Enjoy!



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