Archive for the ‘Delaware History’ Category

Delaware Public Archives to Feature “Behind the Scenes” Tour for Dover Days

Monday, April 27th, 2015

If you were born, married, or attended public school in Delaware, eventually the Delaware Public Archives (DPA) will receive the information that documents these important events. On Saturday, May 2, 1:30 p.m. the staff of the Archives will conduct a tour of this remarkable facility.

This annual “behind the scenes” tour of the building, conducted by Tom Summers, Manager of Outreach Services, offers the public a rare opportunity to learn more about the role of the DPA, and see how the Archives preserves and protects the records that are important to every Delawarean. Archives Director Stephen M. Marz notes that “many people who have toured the Archives are surprised by the amount of documents and photographs that are stored at the facility. Because the Delaware Public Archives serves as the official government repository for state, county and local government records, the Archives is well known as a valuable resource for researchers, genealogists, and historians.”

This special tour at the Archives will honor the Dover Days theme of Abraham Lincoln by featuring a display of original Civil War era documents that can only be viewed on the tour. Among the items that will be a proclamation to commemorate the end of the war; a muster-in roll for the First Regiment, Delaware Infantry; and an order concerning the assassination of President Lincoln. This event is free to the public and no reservations are required.

How Do I Preserve My Documents, Photographs and Digital Memories?

Wednesday, March 25th, 2015

When it comes to family history, those books, papers and photographs we all keep stored away do more than just record the past — they connect us with our loved ones and ancestors, and often tell us as much about our present and future as they do about our history.

Join the Delaware Public Archives (DPA) to learn how to preserve these artifacts for future generations. On Saturday, April 4, at 10:30 a.m., the Archives will show you how to properly handle and store your family’s treasures to protect those irreplaceable memories and ensure long term preservation. Archives staff member Sarah Denison, coordinator of the historical markers program, will present information on the preservation of paper documents and photographs and will address digital preservation and changing technology. Managing memories for the future requires careful action and consideration of cost and longevity. This program will highlight some of the cost-effective steps every home archivist can take to preserve their precious family records.

Before taking over the historic markers program, Ms. Denison worked as a processing archivist at DPA and worked on a number of collections, including the Small Manuscript Collection’s Civil War letters; Board of Education photographs; Sussex County Orphans Court Records; the Caley Postcard Collection; and the Vietnam Mailbag Collection. Ms. Denison is currently pursuing her master’s degree at Drexel University in Library and Information Science with concentrations in Archival Studies and Digital Curation.

The workshop is free to the public and will last approximately one hour. No reservations are required. For more information, contact Tom Summers (302) 744-5047 or e-mail thomas.summers@state.de.us.

“More Treasures of the Archives” Program Coming to the Lewes Public Library on Monday Night

Friday, February 20th, 2015

On Monday night, February 23, 6:30 p.m., Tom Summers, Outreach Services Manager at the Delaware Public Archives, will be speaking at the Lewes Public Library in Lewes, Delaware. Summers will be presenting a program titled “More Treasures of the Delaware Public Archives.” While the Delaware Public Archives has presented its original “Treasures” program for many years in venues throughout the First State, the Archives is returning with this new presentation which will feature an array of unique documents and photographs that provide a look at Delaware life from the 17th century to the present. These images tell the story of the First State and the people who have made Delaware their home. This program is free to the public and no reservations are required.

Researching African American Genealogy: From the Antebellum Period to the Reconstruction Era

Tuesday, January 27th, 2015

Nineteenth century African American genealogy is particularly difficult for researchers. On Saturday, February 7, at 10:30 a.m. the Delaware Public Archives will host a special program which will explore this challenging time period for African American genealogy. Presented by Shamele Jordon, the program will focus on a variety of sources and strategies for locating ancestors using federal, county, and organizational records from reconstruction back to the slavery time period. Records to be discussed include Freedmen’s Bureau, Freedman’s Bank, probate records and more.

Shamele Jordon is a researcher, lecturer and podcaster. A researcher for the PBS series, Oprah’s Roots: African American Lives Special and African American Lives II, Jordon has served as president of the African American Genealogy Group in Philadelphia, lectured at the Institute of Genealogy and Historical Research in Birmingham, Alabama, and been a board member of the Genealogical Society of Pennsylvania.

The program is free to the public and will last approximately one hour. No reservations are required. For more information, contact Tom Summers (302) 744-5047 or e-mail thomas.summers@state.de.us.

Upcoming Program at the Archives about Delaware in the War of 1812

Friday, December 19th, 2014

In 1814 the War of 1812 was entering into its second full year. During the previous year the Chesapeake Bay and the Delaware Valley region experienced active naval campaigning and a seaborne blockade. On Saturday, January 3, at 10:30 a.m. historian Charles (Chuck) Fithian will visit the Delaware Public Archives to present a program on this little known period of Delaware history. Delawareans were active participants in these events and directly experienced the effects of naval irregular warfare. In 1814, they would continue to aid in the national defense, and would respond to new threats brought about by this destructive war.

Mr. Fithian, a resident of Dover, is an historical archaeologist who has directed the research and conservation of the DeBraak and its large associated collection. With a concentration in colonial, military and naval history, Fithian is a graduate of Wesley College and Salisbury University, and has recently retired from the State of Delaware after more than 27 years of service. He has also conducted extensive research on 17th century Delaware, the Delaware Regiment during the American Revolution, and the War of 1812.

The program is free to the public and will last approximately one hour. No reservations are required. For more information, contact Katelyn Fair (302) 744-5016 or e-mail katelyn.fair@state.de.us.

Thanksgiving Proclamations

Monday, November 24th, 2014

Katie Hallreference archivist

Americans have celebrated Thanksgiving in some form since 1789. President Abraham Lincoln signed a proclamation in 1863 that Thanksgiving should fall on the last Thursday of November and for the most part, states celebrated the holiday at the end of the month. However, it wasn’t until President Franklin Delano Roosevelt signed a Joint Resolution of Congress in 1941 that we began celebrating the holiday on the Fourth Thursday of November. The National Archives has that proclamation available online for all to see.

Between 1863 and 1941, before the day became a national holiday, presidents and state governors made annual Thanksgiving proclamations setting aside the day as one of thanksgiving and reflection. The Governors Papers Collection at the Delaware Public Archives has a nice selection of Thanksgiving proclamations from former Delaware governors’. Some invoke the “early settlers upon our shores, beset by hardships and perils,” like Governor Buck did in 1935:

Governor Buck Thanksgiving Proclamation, 1935 Governors Paper Collection RG 1302.007

 

In 1893, Governor Reynolds saw that Delawareans had been regarding Thanksgiving as “a day for indulgence in riotous living and worldly sports, contrary to the spirit in which the custom originated” and encouraged “the people of this State [to] lay aside all secular occupations” on that day:

Gov. Reynolds Thanksgiving Proclamation, 1893 Governors Papers Collection RG 1302.007

Gov. Reynolds Thanksgiving Proclamation, 1893
Governors Papers Collection
RG 1302.007

 

In a similar vein, in 1901, Governor John Hunn recommended “that on that day all business of whatever character be suspended, and that the people assemble in their accustomed places of public worship, and there render thanks for those inestimable benefits which have been accorded them.”

Gov. Hunn Thanksgiving Proclamation, 1901 Governors Papers Collection RG 1302.007

 

Which proclamation is your favorite?

Delaware Votes

Monday, November 3rd, 2014

Sarah Denison, processing archivist

Tomorrow Delawareans up and down the state will head to polling places to cast their vote in the midterm election. Not sure who to vote for? For hundreds of years political parties and special-interest groups have issued flyers endorsing candidates. Check out these tickets from the 1800s. They won’t help you make a decision tomorrow, but they might inspire you to follow in the footsteps of generations of Delawareans to get out and vote.

 

Working Mens Republican Reform Ballot, General Reference Collection 9270.001

Working Mens Republican Reform Ballot, General Reference Collection 9270.001

Republican Ballot 1840s, General Reference Collection 9270.001

Republican Ballot 1840s, General Reference Collection 9270.001

Democratic Ballot 1846, General Reference Collection 9270.001

Democratic Ballot 1846, General Reference Collection 9270.001

Sussex County American Republican Ballot 1834, General Reference Collection 9270.001

Sussex County American Republican Ballot 1834, General Reference Collection 9270.001

1874 Farmers Ticket, General Reference Collection 9270.001

1874 Farmers Ticket, General Reference Collection 9270.001

1858 Peoples Ticket,General Reference Collection 9270.001

1858 Peoples Ticket,General Reference Collection 9270.001

And They’re Off!!!

Friday, September 12th, 2014
Dawn Mitchell, supervisor, Mabel Lloyd Ridgely Research Room

That’s what the Harrington Raceway track announcer will be saying around 7:30 on Monday night when the country’s top pacers will be set to do battle in the 8th Annual Bobby Quillen Memorial Pace. This race honors longtime Delaware legislator Bobby Quillen. Representative Quillen was known for his smile, optimism, and the fact the he never wore socks. He served two separate stints in the state House of Representatives from 1966 to 1972 and from 1982 to 2004, spending two of his terms in leadership as the majority whip from 1992 to 1996. Quillen was also a director of the Harrington Raceway and loved the great Delaware tradition of harness racing. With one of the biggest purses offered in Delaware at over $200,000 this harness race draws not only the top pacers in the country, but the top harness drivers. Last year a new track record was set with an amazing 1:49.2 mile! The richest pacer of all time, Foiled Again, is starting in the 1 hole. The United States Trotting Association is calling for an exciting race after last Monday’s elimination races.

If you would like to learn more about Delaware’s Harness Racing, why not stop by and check out Harness Racing Minutes from 1949-2003. Or drop in and look at old photographs from Harrington Raceway. For all of you going on Monday night to see a great Delaware tradition continue, we thought you may enjoy this photo from Harrington Raceway from 1947.

Harness Racing in Harrington, 1947. 1325-003-036-106pn

Harness Racing in Harrington, 1947. 1325-003-036-106pn

 

“Well Broken Chincoteague Pony For Sale”

Thursday, August 28th, 2014

Katie Hall, reference archivist

While searching old beach newspapers for Labor Day-related articles, this full-page advertisement for an auction of lots in the Heights section of Rehoboth Beach in the August 31, 1934, edition of the Delaware Coast Press caught our eyes.

Delaware Coast Press August 31, 1934

Delaware Coast Press
August 31, 1934

The auction took place on Labor Day weekend “on the premises near the ocean in the heights.” Henry Conant, a developer from Chincoteague, had initially acquired the 150 acres that would make up the Rehoboth Heights section of Rehoboth in 1923 from Col. Robert Hinckley. By 1934, The Heights section contained the areas made up by Philadelphia Avenue to the North, the Atlantic Ocean to the East, Silver Lake to the South, and the Lewes-Rehoboth Canal to the West. The Rehoboth Beach Country Club golf course was in the western part of The Heights until it moved in 1966. The Heights later became part of South Rehoboth—one of the last sections annexed into the city. This 1938 map of Rehoboth shows the location of The Heights just a few years after the Labor Day auction.

Delaware Cities & Towns Map Collection II (RG 1325.203) Rehoboth Beach, 1938

Delaware Cities & Towns Map Collection II
RG 1325.203
Rehoboth Beach, 1938

The lots “with all their natural beauty, adorned with lovely big oaks and pines, high land and near the boardwalk” would have been extremely desirable. To sweeten the pot further, Mr. Conant offered anyone who bought a lot an entry in a drawing to win a Chincoteague pony, along with a bridle and saddle! An item in the Coast Press from September 7, 1934, called the auction a success, with all 25 lots selling at a “reasonable price.” A Miss Nancy Ingram was the lucky winner of “Mick,” the Chincoteague pony. The pony got to live in the garage, while the family’s car “remains in the rain.”

Delaware Coast Press September 7, 1934

Delaware Coast Press
September 7, 1934

All must not have been rosy between Mick and Miss Ingram. A notice in the September 21 Coast Press advertised a “Well Broken Chincoteague Pony including a bridle and saddle” for sale. Interested parties were to contact Nancy Ingram.

Delaware Coast Press September 21, 1934

Delaware Coast Press
September 21, 1934

The History of Farming in Delaware

Tuesday, July 22nd, 2014

Farming and its related agricultural industries have been a major force in the social, cultural, and economic history of Delaware. Today, agriculture remains the state’s largest industry, generating over $1 billion in income from an array of crops, poultry, and livestock. On Saturday, August 2, at 10:30 a.m., Delaware Secretary of Agriculture Ed Kee, will discuss the rich history and tradition of Delaware farming and the major role it has played in the progress and evolution of the First State.

Ed Kee, a nationally and internationally recognized expert on vegetable science, is a native of Delaware who has spent his entire career in agriculture. Appointed as the Kent County agricultural agent for the University of Delaware in 1978, Kee eventually became the state vegetable crops specialist. In 2004, he was appointed as the extension agricultural program leader. Retiring from the University in 2008, Kee worked for Hanover Foods Corporation as director of agriculture before being confirmed as the Delaware Secretary of Agriculture in 2009.

The program, to be held at the Delaware Public Archives, is free to the public and will last approximately one hour. No reservations are required. For more information, contact Tom Summers (302) 744-5047 or e-mail thomas.summers@state.de.us.

 

Secretary of Agriculture Ed Kee

Secretary of Agriculture Ed Kee